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All Posts in Category: Footwear

The Right Shoes For Sports

Shoes for Sports

Avoid Pain & Raise Your Game

Sport-specific shoes can really affect the way you play. Make sure to have your feet professionally measured by today’s podiatrist to find a correctly sized shoe. If you participate in a certain sport at least two to three times a week, you should wear a sport-specific shoe.

Avoid some serious pain and raise your game by checking out the best shoes for several sports below:

Basketball

Common foot injuries: sprains, tendinitis, stress fractures

The perfect basketball shoe should:
• Have a thick, stiff sole that gives support while running and landing jumps.
• Have high ankle construction that supports the ankle during quick changes in direction.

Soccer

Common foot injuries: ankle sprains, turf toe, ingrown toenails

The perfect soccer cleat should:
• Not have more than a half inch of space between the big toe and the end of the shoe.
• Feature the stud type for the ground that will be played on most often: soft, hard, or firm.

Football & Lacrosse

Common foot injuries: turf toe, Achilles tendinitis

The perfect football cleat should:
• Have a good amount of high ankle support. This is especially important for linemen and other players who make frequent sideways movements during play.
• Allow for proper traction on a grassy field, in both wet and dry conditions. This will largely help to prevent injury.

Running

Common foot injuries: plantar fasciitis, shin splints, Morton’s neuroma

The perfect running shoe should:
• Provide maximum shock absorption, to help runners avoid ailments.
• Match your foot’s arch type (high, medium, low).

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elderly couple walking

Balance-Boosting Footwear Tips for Older People

Balance in all aspects of life is a good thing. We work hard but make time for fun, love our children while setting boundaries, and eat healthy to enjoy a sundae on Friday night. But mental equilibrium isn’t the only kind of balance that’s important in life. Good physical balance can help older people avoid the debilitating and potentially life-threatening complications of a fall.

Falls are the leading cause of fatal and non-fatal injuries among older people, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). In 2010, 2.3 million fall injuries sent older folks to emergency rooms; 662,000 required hospitalizations; and falls cost $30 billion in direct medical costs, the CDC says.

“Preventing falls among older Americans is a top health priority, and improved balance can help reduce the risk of a fall,” says Dr. Matthew Garoufalis, a podiatrist and past-president of APMA. “Proper footwear can help improve balance, especially in older people who may struggle with mobility and balance issues.”

When selecting a shoe to improve balance, keep these guidelines in mind:

  • Put shoes to the 1-2-3 test.
    Step 1: Press on both sides of the heel area to ensure the heel is stiff and won’t collapse.
    Step 2: Bend the shoe to check for toe flexibility. The shoe shouldn’t bend too much in the toe box area, but it shouldn’t be too stiff and inflexible either.
    Step 3: Try twisting the shoe; it shouldn’t twist in the middle.
  • Have your feet professionally measured every time you shoe shop. Natural aging and health changes can cause the size of your feet to change. Measure both feet—late in the day—and shop for the larger foot.
  • Bring the type of socks you plan to wear with the shoes and walk around the store in the shoes before you purchase them.
  • If you don’t feel comfortable or steady in the store, don’t buy them. Shoes should feel comfortable and supportive right away; if they don’t feel good right away, breaking them in won’t improve things.
  • If you have specific health challenges or foot issues, talk to a podiatrist about the best footwear for your needs. If your podiatrist has prescribed orthotics—biomechanical inserts that go into your shoes—take them with you when you shop and try them out in the shoes you’re considering.
  • Quality shoes can be an investment. Before you buy, check to see if the brand and style you’re considering have earned the APMA Seal of Acceptance. APMA grants the seals to products found to promote good foot health.
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Power Shoes: Choosing The Right Footwear For Climbing The Corporate Ladder

Climbing the corporate ladder requires marketable skills, initiative, creativity, and … the right shoes? While the importance of proper footwear may seem obvious for professions that require standing or walking all day, such as waitressing, nursing, or cooking, poor shoe choices can also trip you up in an office setting.

“At best, sore feet can be a troublesome distraction when you need to concentrate in a meeting or be at your best during a job interview,” says Catherine Hudson, DPM, a podiatrist at Foot and Ankle Center and member of the American Podiatric Medical Association (APMA). “At worst, severe foot injuries from poor footwear can require corrective surgery that puts you out of commission—and out of the office—for extended periods of time.”

While you may assume that some professions are more prone to injury than others, or that women wearing high heels are more at risk, everyone working nine to five should take steps to ensure he or she heads to work every morning wearing shoes that will help—not hinder—job performance.

When you’re choosing a dress shoe for work, keep these tips in mind:

Shoes for women

  • Avoid wearing heels higher than two inches. If you choose to wear very high heels for a meeting or other work occasion, limit the time you’re in them and change into a lower, more comfortable pair as soon as possible.
  • Vary heel height from day to day. Look for “walking” pumps—also called “comfort” or “performance” pumps—with mid- to low heels. APMA offers a list of shoes that have earned its Seal of Acceptance for promoting good foot health, available at www.apma.org/seal.
  • Look for plenty of toe room. Ideally, pumps with wider, rounded, or square toe boxes give your toes more room. “Avoid shoes with pointy toes that squeeze digits into unnatural positions,” says Dr. Hudson. “Cramped toes can cause a host of foot woes, from bunions to ingrown toenails.”
  • Choose wider heels that offer more stability. Stiletto heels and similar pointy heels are less stable and may cause spinal misalignment and ankle injuries.
  • Beware ballet flats. You may think no-heel shoes are better for your feet, but often that’s not the case. Ballet flats offer little cushioning or support, and can also cause foot problems such as plantar fasciitis, an inflammation of the tendon that connects the heel bone to the toes.
  • Regardless of heel height or shoe style, look for shoes that offer adequate arch and ankle support, and plenty of cushioning.

Shoes for men

  • Look for good quality oxford styles—like wing-tip or cap-toe designs—which tend to be best. You can also opt for slip-ons, dressy loafers, and low dress boots.
  • Avoid wearing the same pair of shoes every day. You should have at least three or four pairs of good quality professional shoes.
  • When shoes become too worn to be supportive anymore, replace them. You may be tempted to hold on to that old pair of shoes you love, but apart from looking unprofessional, worn-out shoes also provide less support for your feet.

Tips for men and women:

  • Always shop at the end of the day when feet are at their largest.
  • Choose quality materials that allow the foot to breathe.
  • Look for shoes that offer good support.

“Never buy a pair of shoes that are uncomfortable, assuming you’ll break them in,” adds Dr. Hudson. “Shoes should be comfortable right away. If they’re not, then they’re not the right shoes for your feet!”

Catherine Hudson, DPM, is a podiatrist at Foot and Ankle Center in Marerro, Louisiana. Call 504-349-6633 or visit http://www.footandanklenola.com/schedule-an-appointment/ to make an appointment. Visit www.apma.org to learn more about foot health and care.

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